Introductory phrase sentence examples

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Put another way, introductory words that appear at the beginning of a sentence are set off from what follows by commas. If you omit these words, the sentence still means the same thing. Common introductory words include yes, no, well, oh, and okay.Read these examples twice, once with the introductory words and once without. A comma is recommended after any introductory prepositional phrase of more than four words.Correct: Under the kitchen table the dog cowered.(Single short, clear phrase.

No comma needed.)Correct: Under the spreading chestnut tree, thevillage smithy stands.(Comma optional, but helpful due to length of phrase)Correct: Under the pile of clothes, we found his wallet.(Two prepositional phrases, not in a series)Incorrect: On the sand, of the beach, by theinlet, we relaxed in the sun.(Do not separate the phraCommas After Introductory Phrases Commas After Introductory PhrasesPrepositional PhrasesUse a comma to separate a group of prepositional phrases of more than four words when the phrases come at the beginning of a sentence.Do not use a comma between separate phrases unless they are in a series.A comma may also set off a single prepositional phrase at the beginning to make the sentence clear.

No comma needed.)Correct: Under the spreading chestnut tree, thevillage smithy stands.(Comma optional, but helpful due to length of phrase)Correct: Under the pile of clothes, we found his wallet.(Two prepositional phrases, not in a series)Incorrect: On the sand, of the beach, by theinlet, we relaxed in the sun.(Do not separate the phraA good way to break up a group of sentences that all have the same subject-verb-object format is to use an introductory phrase, which makes the reading a bit more interesting and engaging.Example:The drilling should be finished by Monday.

The completion should be installed by Thursday. For example. Introductory clauses start with adverbs like after, although, as, because, before, if, since, though, until, when, etc. Introductory phrasesIntroductory phrases also set the stage for the main action of the sentence, but they are not complete clauses. Common introductory phrases include prepositional phrases, appositive phrases, participial phrases, infinitive phrases, and absolute phrases.

It sets the stage for the main part of the sentence. Sometimes a comma is necessary after an introductory phrase. Other times, the comma is optional, and there are also times when a comma should not be used. It is important to note that a comma should always be used if the sentence could be misinterpreted otherwise. When to UsSlideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising.

If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy.Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Introductory PhrasesIntroductory phrases and clauses pretty much do what they say do.

They introduce something. We like to think of it as setting the stage for the rest of the sentence. You should use a comma after you have prepared readers with an introductory element in order to let them know that the main subject and verb are yet to follow. Introductory parts of a sentence can be small, medium or laCommas After Introductory Phrases Commas After Introductory PhrasesPrepositional PhrasesUse a comma to separate a group of prepositional phrases of more than four words when the phrases come at the beginning of a sentence.Do not use a comma between separate phrases unless they are in a series.A comma may also set off a single prepositional phrase at the beginning to make the sentence clear.

No comma needed.)Correct: Under the spreading chestnut tree, thevillage smithy stands.(Comma optional, but helpful due to length of phrase)Correct: Under the pile of clothes, we found his wallet.(Two prepositional phrases, not in a series)Incorrect: On the sand, of the beach, by theinlet, we relaxed in the sun.(Do not separate the phraA phrase is a group or words that express a concept and is used as a unit within a sentence. Eight common types of phrases are: noun, verb, gerund, infinitive, appositive, participial, prepositional, and absolute.

Essentially, they prepare your readers for what the sentence is really about, or the meat of the sentence. The element is a clause if there is a subject and a verb, and it is a phrase if both of these parts of speech are not present. What comes after the introductory element is always an independent clause, or complete sentence, on its own, and the introductory element gives meaning to it.

After the adjustment for inflation, real wages have deSlideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. Introductory phrases give your writing a varied sentence structure and a sophisticated style. Knowing the five types of introductory phrases and what purpose each serves can give you some ideas for writing sentences with introductory phrases.

It can act as a noun, adjective or adverb. Here are some examples of senIntroductory Phrases.




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